A few years ago when there was snow on the ground we were headed to close Findlay and when I was just turning to land, I thought I saw a cabin.  I knew that there had been a prospector on Findlay and my Dad had told me that there was a cabin on the west end of the lake.  While we were there working on the dock we decided to go see if we could find it.

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We found it.  Quite aways back into the bush.  You wouldn’t see it if there was leaves on the trees.  Everything was still intact.  If you really needed a dry place to sleep, this place would work.  All of his stuff was built out either Birch bark or cardboard.  There was 2 beds inside, one foldable cot and a bed made from sticks from the bush.  The walls were made from logs and he used moss to seal it all.  Most of the moss is still in between the logs.  The roof was simply a layer of small logs, a layer of tar paper, a bunch of flat rocks, and then another layer of logs.  It would still keep you dry after no one has been there in over 30 years.  There was nothing outside but a metal basin for a sink and a flattened out piece of Birch bark that must have been a table.  The only thing left behind was a bunch of mosquito coils.

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The same prospector was probably the guy who had enough drive to dig this trench into the granite on Loree Lake.  I came across this at the out going falls on Loree lake while moose hunting.  From the cabin on Findlay, this is around 7-8 miles but by water it is probably 15 miles.  He would have been scouring the rocks in search of anything out of the ordinary.  Before much technology, it was all done by having the know-how to read the rocks.  Since the recent fires I can notice in certain areas where the rocks change, signifying that there could be minerals of some sort nearby or deep beneath the rock.

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